Marian Cramer

by Hideki Iinuma

From 22-11-2020 To 29-11-2020

We cordially invite you to:

AMSTERDAM GALLERY WEEKEND POP-UP

Friday 27, Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 November 2020

Daily 12 – 6 PM

During Amsterdam Gallery Weekend

Sabine van Delft–Vroom hosts Marian Cramer Projects POP-UP

at Keizersgracht 677 Amsterdam

Artists:

Bijijoo

Nicolás Romero Escalada

Martina Grlic

Jack Sure

 

These international artists belong to a new movement that focuses on the figurative in art and on the narrative potential of the painting.
The results represent experiences, interactions and movements frozen in a personal space and time.

 

We follow the RIVM guidelines!

If you prefer a time-slot please contact: info@mariancramer.com

Marian Cramer Projects | www.mariancramer.com | tel: +31614780171

Martina Grlic, The Oracale, 50x40cm, Oil on linen, 2020

Bijijoo’s paintings result from process-driven experimentation with painting media and automatic drawing, using traditional and digital techniques. He builds mixed media layers to amplify interplays of light, color and texture. Images are conjured from chaos, in a process akin to divination. The forms that take shape trend toward human and animal: grotesque exaggerations of life, monstrous cartoons. Unplanned narratives emerge through these interactions, reflecting struggle, celebration, and vanitas. The results depict experiences, interactions, and movements frozen in a personal space and time.
Bijijoo (given name: Michael Todd Horne; nickname: B) was born in Atlanta, Georgia (USA) in 1975 and has lived in New York City; Seattle, Washington; and Eugene, Oregon. B currently resides in Portland, Oregon with his wife and daughter.
B has been painting and drawing since childhood. He has experimented with figurative, abstract and conceptual work in a variety of media, including writing, music and video. B diverged from art practice to pursue technical studies in mathematics, physics, computer science and chemistry, culminating in a Ph.D. in biophysics (2008). He then returned to painting by creating several series of surrealist works, including The Presidential Ham, Celebrity Still Life, and The Arthropod Companion.  After pausing to remodel an old house and become a father, he began resetting his painting practice in 2018. B’s current work draws on his technical background in math, science and computer programming, as well as his young daughter’s imagination and love of monsters. 

Twenty years ago Nicolás Romero (Buenos Aires, 1985) began signing as ‘Ever’ and doing graffiti in the streets of Buenos Aires, a city that was living the hangover of a military dictatorship that had lasted eight years and that at that time understood street art as an expression of freedom. He moved away from graffiti to start developing murals with which he experiments and plays with its symbolic charge in his confrontation with public space.
At present, Nicolás is developing his work around “Still Life paintings”, in which through the union of elements he has found a way to use the image as a means of social reflection and anthropological research. He works through traces that he finds in his most immediate context, the result of the social network and symbols born from the coexistence of social, cultural and economic factors. From soft drink bottles to religious prints, political symbols, contemporary icons or something as apparently innocent as fruits and vegetables are part of these compositions that he uses as a bridge to talk about more complex realities.
Romero’s training in painting and drawing began in 1999 with Ariel Olivetti and between 2007 and 2008 he studied at the Rojas Cultural Center. In 2014 he was selected for the Facebook artists’ program and from 2019 he participated in the study method “Work Clinic” with the artist Diana Aisenberg. He has had solo exhibitions at the gallery The Diogenes Club in Los Angeles, at Varsi Gallery in Rome, Libertad Gallery in Queretaro or Dinámica Gallery in Buenos Aires, besides having participated in other group shows in France, Italy, Netherlands, South Africa, Austria, Australia, Mexico, Spain and the United States. His work has been selected in cultural institutions such as the Amalita Fortabat Museum and Palais de Glace in Buenos Aires, the Macro Museum in the city of Rosario or the Biennial of urban interventions in the CCEC and the Caraffa Museum in Córdoba, Argentina.

Martina Grlić belongs to a new stream of Croatian painting, which focuses on the figurative in art and on the narrative potential of the painting. Her body of work is a critical reflection on the changes that took place, and are still happening in the post-socialist societies. In her method, she explores the legacy of the political, economic and social system of the socialist era by deconstructing it through the gender aspect, patterns of the politics of memory, and reading of the image.
The method she uses is based on ethnography and autoethnography of everyday life and popular culture as well as the transformation of documentary photographs into the painting background.
Martina Grlić, b. 1982 Zagreb, lives and works in Zagreb, Croatia. She received her M.A. from the Academy of Fine Arts Zagreb, Croatia.
Solo exhibitions include: Potemka Gallery, Leipzig (2019), HDLU Zagreb (2018). Kranjcar Gallery, Zagreb (2017). Gallery Simulaker, Novo Mesto(2016). Gallery Poola, Pula (2015). Gallery Josip Racic, Zagreb (2014). Gallery Karas, Zagreb (2013). Gallery SC, Zagreb (2010).
Selected group exhibitions include: Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb (2017). HDLU Zagreb (2016). National Museum Gdanjsk (2016). Ningbo Museum of Art, Ningbo (2015). KIBLA, Maribor (2014), Kunstlerhaus Vienna (2011).
She won HPB prize for young artist in 2017 and First Prize for painting from Erste bank.

Jack Sure’s works are a distilled reflection of the significant moments, lessons and inspirations of his life. Pulling imagery from both his childhood, currently and perhaps the future simultaneously. Sure wants his pictures to tell a story that is not an obvious one, but one that takes a moment of contemplation and discovery while pushing boundaries of ugliness and beauty. It invites the observer to recognize that one cannot exist without the other. To him beauty is a choice by way of transmutation thus, only existing through perception. Because of this Jack Sure’s work is organic in a way that it is constantly evolving and transforming itself .

HIDEKI IINUMA

by Hideki Iinuma

From 07-03-2020 To 02-05-2020

Open by appointment:

Tel: +31614780171

email: info@mariancramer.com

IG: marian_cramer

LOCATION: CHOPINSTRAAT 31, AMSTERDAM

“Hideki Iinuma’s work is spiritual. There is an intimate or intense dialogue with the tree spirit hidden in the wooden material and the chisel.

The magical vitality emerges in the shape of the human body”

Hideki Iinuma (B. Nagano, 1975) belongs to the young generation of Japanese artists who critically analyze the current changes through his sculptures. The girl-image evolved from Neo-Pop forms his main inspiration, as does the changing perception of women in Japanese society. His figures carved from Camphor wood, often exuding a hint of ostentatious sexuality, mostly represent models from Pintarest and Instagram. For women in Japan as for those in Europe these young women are becoming more and more ‘muses’, fashion icons.

With his figures sculpted from wood, Iinuma finds himself in a borderland between Western and Eastern culture marked both by contrasts and similarities. After completing his study at Graduate School of Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music in 1998, Iinuma entered Ecole Regionale des Beaux-Arts, Nantes (France). He took part in student exchange program (ERASMUS), which led him to study in Copenhagen (Denmark), Milan (Italy) and Karlsruhe (Germany). Iinuma uses the old ichiboku-zukuri technique common in Japan until the 10th century. He combines this technique with a special surface treatment that leaves the traces of the grain still visible under a coat of paint.

Hideki Iinuma, who is strongly drawn to Georg Baselitz, is often compared to Stephan Balkenhol (b. 1957). Iinuma’s sculptures share the secular, contemporary subject matter, the dominance of the plinth and the visibility of the tool marks in common. But the differences are greater: while Balkenhol figures have a raw, coarse surface structure, Iinuma’s sculptures are worked in a finer, more homogeneous way. The emotional emptiness and stereotypical impersonality of expression that distinguish Balkenhol, make way in Iinuma to a more individual characterisation. Looking at them directly, behind the façade of their made-up faces, personalities marked by individual life stories can be discerned. The posing models and the exposed nudes seem to be taking pains over their attitude and expressionlessness, endeavouring to construct a protective façade. Hideki Iinuma unmasks the contemporary ideal of beauty as a depersonalised surface for projecting exaggerated desires and excessive consumerism. By releasing the female figures from their context, characterised by fast living and superficiality, reproducing them in wood, a natural, archaic material, and giving a glimpse of their personality, he endows them with new dignity and individuality.

Iinuma won the Ernst Barlach Prize 2005 and exhibits internationally.

In 2016 Hideki Iinuma had a large solo exhibition FIGHTING THE GODDESSES at the Matsumoto Museum Nagano, Japan.
Recently he received First prize at Lumine Meets Art Award Tokio and Rokko Meets Art 2013, Kobe, Japan. His work is widely collected.

Hideki Iinuma works and lives in Tokyo.

by Hideki Iinuma

From 02-10-2019 To 06-10-2019

Art The Hague | 2-6 October 2019 | Booth # 24

Daniel Mullen

Hideki Iinuma

Daniel Lipp

David Lindberg 

Annabel Emson

Daniel Mullen, 76-04, 150x140cm, Acrylic on canvas, 2019

Art The Hague
Fokker Terminal
Binckhorstlaan 249
2516 BB  Den Haag

Group show with represented artists

by Hideki Iinuma

From 13-01-2019 To 23-02-2019

Painting, photography, video & sculpture

 

works by: Peter Bogers, Hideki Iinuma, Thomas Langley & David Lindberg

Hideki Iinuma

Anna, 2009

H 65x20x21cm

Cypress

 

by Hideki Iinuma

From 17-02-2018 To 14-04-2018

IMG_5944

Marian Cramer is proud to present the fourth solo show with new works by the Japanese artist Hideki Iinuma (Nagano, 1975).

Iinuma belongs to the young generation of Japanese artists who critically analyse the current changes through his sculptures. The girl-image evolved from Neo-Pop forms his main inspiration, as does the changing perception of women in Japanese society. His figures carved from Camphor wood, often exuding a hint of ostentatious sexuality, mostly represent models from Pintarest and Instagram. For women in Japan as for those in Europe these young women are becoming more and more ‘muses’, fashion icons.

With this new ‘Surf girls series’ Iinuma depicts positive energy. An escape from fast fashion consumption.

With his figures sculpted from wood, Iinuma finds himself in a borderland between Western and Eastern culture marked both by contrasts and similarities. After completing his study at Graduate School of Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music in 1998, Iinuma entered Ecole Regionale des Beaux-Arts, Nantes (France). He took part in student exchange program (ERASMUS), which led him to study in Copenhagen (Denmark), Milan (Italy) and Karlsruhe (Germany). Iinuma uses the old ichiboku-zukuri technique common in Japan until the 10th century. He combines this technique with a special surface treatment that leaves the traces of the grain still visible under a coat of paint.

Hideki Iinuma, who is strongly drawn to Georg Baselitz, is often compared to Stephan Balkenhol (b. 1957). Iinuma’s sculptures share the secular, contemporary subject matter, the dominance of the plinth and the visibility of the tool marks in common. But the differences are greater: while Balkenhol figures have a raw, coarse surface structure, Iinuma’s sculptures are worked in a finer, more homogeneous way. The emotional emptiness and stereotypical impersonality of expression that distinguish Balkenhol, make way in Iinuma to a more individual characterisation. Looking at them directly, behind the façade of their made-up faces, personalities marked by individual life stories can be discerned. The posing models and the exposed nudes seem to be taking pains over their attitude and expressionlessness, endeavouring to construct a protective façade. Hideki Iinuma unmasks the contemporary ideal of beauty as a depersonalised surface for projecting exaggerated desires and excessive consumerism. By releasing the female figures from their context, characterised by fast living and superficiality, reproducing them in wood, a natural, archaic material, and giving a glimpse of their personality, he endows them with new dignity and individuality.

Iinuma won the Ernst Barlach Prize 2005 and exhibits internationally. In 2016 Hideki Iinuma had a large solo exhibition FIGHTING THE GODDESSES at the Matsumoto Museum Nagano, Japan.

Recently he received First prize at Lumine Meets Art Award Tokio and Rokko Meets Art 2013, Kobe, Japan. His work is widely collected.

Hideki Iinuma works and lives in Tokyo.

De galerie is open op afspraak van maandag t/m zaterdag 11-18 u / The Gallery is open by appointment Monday to Saturday 11am-6pm

AMSTERDAM ART FAIR

by Hideki Iinuma

From 16-05-2017 To 21-05-2017

001.MARIAN CRAMER PROJECTS 2017-PH.GJ.vanROOIJ

Dani_1A kopie

2017_Leonore_Fidelio_H71x18x16cm_Zelkova_

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Locatie Amsterdam Art Fair:  Huidekoperstraat 28, 1017 ZM Amsterdam

Openingstijden:

 

Zaterdag 20 mei 11.00 – 19.00 open voor publiek

Zondag 21 mei 11.00 – 17.00 open voor publiek

MUSE

by Hideki Iinuma

From 21-05-2016 To 12-07-2016

UNTIL 12th JULY 2016

CLICK TO WATCH HIDEKI IINUMA WORKING

 

 

 

 

2015_Lodoicea_h52x26x14cm_Cypress_3

 

 

IMG_4401

 

Marian Cramer Projects is proud to present the third solo show, MUSE, with new works by the Japanese artist Hideki Iinuma (Nagano, 1975).

Mid September Hideki Iinuma will have a large solo exhibition FIGHTING THE GODDESSES at the Matsumoto Museum Nagano, Japan.

Iinuma belongs to the young generation of Japanese artists who critically analyse the current changes through his sculptures. The girl-image evolved from Neo-Pop forms his main inspiration, as does the changing perception of women in Japanese society. His figures carved from Camphor wood, often exuding a hint of ostentatious sexuality, mostly represent models from Pintarest and Instagram. For women in Japan as for those in Europe these young women are becoming more and more ‘muses’, fashion icons.

With his figures sculpted from wood, Iinuma finds himself in a borderland between Western and Eastern culture marked both by contrasts and similarities. After completing his study at Graduate School of Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music in 1998, Iinuma entered Ecole Regionale des Beaux-Arts, Nantes (France). He took part in student exchange program (ERASMUS), which led him to study in Copenhagen (Denmark), Milan (Italy) and Karlsruhe (Germany). Iinuma uses the old ichiboku-zukuri technique common in Japan until the 10th century. He combines this technique with a special surface treatment that leaves the traces of the grain still visible under a coat of paint.

Hideki Iinuma, who is strongly drawn to Georg Baselitz, is often compared to Stephan Balkenhol (b. 1957). Iinuma’s sculptures share the secular, contemporary subject matter, the dominance of the plinth and the visibility of the tool marks in common. But the differences are greater: while Balkenhol figures have a raw, coarse surface structure, Iinuma’s sculptures are worked in a finer, more homogeneous way. The emotional emptiness and stereotypical impersonality of expression that distinguish Balkenhol, make way in Iinuma to a more individual characterisation. Looking at them directly, behind the façade of their made-up faces, personalities marked by individual life stories can be discerned. The posing models and the exposed nudes seem to be taking pains over their attitude and expressionlessness, endeavouring to construct a protective façade. Hideki Iinuma unmasks the contemporary ideal of beauty as a depersonalised surface for projecting exaggerated desires and excessive consumerism. By releasing the female figures from their context, characterised by fast living and superficiality, reproducing them in wood, a natural, archaic material, and giving a glimpse of their personality, he endows them with new dignity and individuality.

Iinuma won the Ernst Barlach Prize 2005 and exhibits internationally. Recently he received First prize at Lumine Meets Art Award Tokio and Rokko Meets Art 2013, Kobe, Japan. His work is widely collected.

Hideki Iinuma works and lives in Tokyo.

 

SHAPESHIFTING

by Hideki Iinuma

From 10-11-2013 To 28-11-2013

Marian Cramer Projects is proud to present the second solo show with new works by the Japanese artist Hideki Iinuma (Nagano, 1975).

Iinuma who recently received First prize at Rokko Meets Art 2013, Kobe, Japan, belongs to the young generation of Japanese artists who critically analyse the current changes through his sculptures. The girl-image evolved from Neo-Pop forms his main inspiration, as does the changing perception of women in Japanese society. His figures carved from Camphor wood, often exuding a hint of ostentatious sexuality, mostly represent models from newspapers and magazines. For women in Japan as for those in Europe these young women are becoming more and more ‘shapeshifted’ fashion icons.

With his figures sculpted from wood, Iinuma finds himself in a borderland between Western and Eastern culture marked both by contrasts and similarities. After completing his study at Graduate School of Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music in 1998, Iinuma entered Ecole Regionale des Beaux-Arts, Nantes (France). He took part in student exchange program (ERASMUS), which led him to study in Copenhagen (Denmark), Milan (Italy) and Karlsruhe (Germany). Iinuma uses the old ichiboku-zukuri technique common in Japan until the 10th century. He combines this technique with a special surface treatment that leaves the traces of the grain still visible under a coat of paint.

Hideki Iinuma, who is strongly drawn to Georg Baselitz, is often compared to Stephan Balkenhol (b. 1957). Iinuma’s sculptures share the secular, contemporary subject matter, the dominance of the plinth and the visibility of the tool marks in common. But the differences are greater: while Balkenhol figures have a raw, coarse surface structure, Iinuma’s sculptures are worked in a finer, more homogeneous way. The emotional emptiness and stereotypical impersonality of expression that distinguish Balkenhol, make way in Iinuma to a more individual characterisation. Looking at them directly, behind the façade of their made-up faces, personalities marked by individual life stories can be discerned. The posing models and the exposed nudes seem to be taking pains over their attitude and expressionlessness, endeavouring to construct a protective façade. Hideki Iinuma unmasks the contemporary ideal of beauty as a depersonalised surface for projecting exaggerated desires and excessive consumerism. By releasing the female figures from their context, characterised by fast living and superficiality, reproducing them in wood, a natural, archaic material, and giving a glimpse of their personality, he endows them with new dignity and individuality.

Iinuma won the Ernst Barlach Prize 2005 and exhibits internationally.  His work is widely collected. Hideki Iinuma works and lives in Tokyo.

Marian Cramer Projects

www.mariancramer.com | info@mariancramer.com | T: +31 (0)6 147 80 171

by Hideki Iinuma

From 11-07-2010 To 29-08-2010

July 11 – August 29

 

 

 

 

LISE HALLER BAGGESEN

 

JURRIAAN MOLENAAR

 

HIDEKI IINUMA

Opening

Sunday July 11, from 3-5 p.m.

location: Chopinstaat 31, Amsterdam

July 12 – August 29:

by appointment only: + 31 (0)6 147 80 171

Hideki Iinuma

Hideki Iinuma Bio